Crepidotus spp.

Scientific names:  Crepidotus mollis (Fr.) Staude;
Crepidotus applanatus (Pers.) P. Kumm.; Crepidotus
crocophyllus
(Berk.) Sacc.
Derivation of name:  Moll- means "soft." Applanatus
means "flattened." Crocophyllus means "saffron-colored
leaves (gills)."
Synonyms:  
Common name(s):  Crepidotus applanatus is called the
Flat Crep; Crepidotus mollis is called the Jelly Crep, and
Crepidotus crocophyllus is called the Orange Crep.
Phylum:   Basidiomycota
Order:   Agaricales
Family:   Inocybaceae
Occurrence on wood substrate:  Saprobic; clustered,
sometimes overlapping on decaying hardwoods (rarely
conifers); July through September.  
Dimensions:  See figure captions.   
Cap:  See figure captions.        
Gills: Radiating from point of attachment.  
Spore print: Brownish.
Stipe: Absent, attached to substrate by a short, hairy plug
of tissue.
Veil: None.
Edibility: Unknown.
Comments: Miller indicates the presence of over 100
species of Crepidotus in North America sharing traits
such as thin flesh, convex to fan-shaped caps,
generally stalkless, inhabiting wood, and having brownish
spores. Most require the use of a microscope to identify
them. Two common species and one uncommon but
distinctive species (C. crocophyllus) are described on
this page.

More information at TomVolkFungi.net
More informationat MushroomExpert.com:

 
Figure 1. Crepidotus mollis. Caps are 1-8 cm wide; color
is variable from olive-brown to ochraceous whitish. Caps
are covered with dark brown fibrous scales. Gills whitish
at first but becoming brownish. Photo © William Roody.


Figure 2. Another view of Crepidotus mollis.
Photo © John Plischke III.


Figure 3. Crepidotus mollis specimens photographed at
the 2007 NEMF foray. Photo © Gary Emberger.

 


Figure 4. Crepidotus mollis is called the Jelly crep because
the gelatinous upper layer of the cap can be stretched. When
I gently attempted to pull apart the cap of the specimen
above, the gelatinous layer stretched to fill the void.
Photo © Gary Emberger.


Figure 5. Same specimen as in Figure 4 but shown from
below. The stretched gelatinous layer spans the space
between the gills. Photo © Gary Emberger.



Figure 6. Crepidotus applanatus. Caps are 1-4 cm wide;
color is white when young, becoming brownish with age.
Caps are hairless or minutely downy. Gills white at first,
becoming brown. Photo © John Plischke III.


Figure 7. Crepidotus applanatus photographed at the 2007
NEMF foray. Photo © Gary Emberger.


Figure 8. Crepidotus crocophyllus with saffron-orange gills
and hairy cap, photographed at the 2007 NEMF foray.
Caps 1-4 cm wide, orange to orange-brown and minutely
scaly. Photo © Gary Emberger.

 

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This page © 2008 by Gary Emberger, Messiah College