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Courage and Conviction

Lectures


Helene Cooper

 

Author of “The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood” and White House Correspondent for the “New York Times”.

 

Helene Cooper is the White House correspondent for the “New York Times.” Prior to that assignment, Cooper had been the diplomatic correspondent and an assistant editorial page editor at the “New York Times.” She spent 12 years as a reporter and foreign correspondent at the “Wall Street Journal.” Cooper was born in Monrovia, Liberia. She recently published her memoir, “The House at Sugar Beach,” which chronicles her youth and coming of age in 1980s Liberia during a period of political unrest. Cooper’s poignant memoir is the 2012 common reading selection for first-year Messiah students.

“Finding My Voice”

 

Common Reading Convocation

 

Sept. 10, 2012, 7 p.m.
Brubaker Auditorium, Eisenhower Campus Center

 

Admission is free and open to the public; no ticket required.

 

For more information, contact Shirley Groff at:

 

groff@messiah.edu

or

717-691-6013

 

Sponsored by the Messiah College Office of General Education and Common Learning


Annette Gordon-Reed


Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor of History, Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Professor of Law at Harvard Law School


Annette Gordon-Reed became interested in Thomas Jefferson after reading a children’s biography of him while growing up in segregated east Texas. After studying history at Dartmouth College, Gordon-Reed earned her own place in history with the Pulitzer Prize-winning book “Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy” (1997), a frequently debated book described by The “New York Times” as “brilliant.” She has also written “Vernon Can Read!: A Memoir” (2001) about presidential confidant and long-time civil rights leader Vernon Jordan. Gordon-Reed has additionally edited 12 essays that illustrate how race often determines the outcome of trials in her most recent book, “Race on Trial: Law and Justice in American History” (2002).

“Thomas Jefferson, Slavery and Sally Hemings”


American Democracy Lecture

 

Nov. 6, 2012, 7 p.m.
Hostetter Chapel

 

Admission is free and open to the public; no ticket required.

 

For more information, contact Tina Keul at:

 

tkeul@messiah.edu

or

717-796-5077

 

Sponsored by the Messiah College Center for Public Humanities and the Department of History


Eric Metaxas

All tickets have been distributed for this event.    


Author of the “New York Times” #1 bestseller, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy


In a decidedly eclectic career, Eric Metaxas has written for VeggieTales, Chuck Colson and the “New York Times.” Most recently, Metaxas authored the “New York Times” #1 bestseller, “Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy,” a “biography of uncommon power” that earned places on numerous 2010 “Book of the Year” lists, won the Beeson Divinity School 2011 John C. Pollock Award for Biography, and was recognized with a 2011 Christopher Award in non-fiction and as Evangelical Christian Publishers Association “Book of the Year.” Metaxas is currently the voice of Breakpoint, a radio commentary broadcast on more than 400 stations and reaching more than eight million people. Metaxas delivered the keynote address at the 2012 National Prayer Breakfast in Washington, D.C., and he is the 17th recipient of the Canterbury Medal awarded by the Becket Fund for Religious Freedom.

“Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy”


Messiah College Honors Program Lecture

 

Nov. 7, 2012, 7:30 p.m.
Hostetter Chapel

 

Sponsored by the Messiah College Honors Program


Rev. Samuel “Billy” Kyles


Pastor, Monumental Baptist Church, Memphis, Tenn.

 

Rev. Samuel “Billy” Kyles has been a pastor of Monumental Baptist Church in South Memphis since 1959. A national leader of the civil rights movement, Kyles was a friend and colleague of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and an eyewitness to King’s assassination. He was appointed by the Clinton Administration to serve on the Advisory Committee on Religious Freedom Abroad and has served as a panelist at the White House Conference on Hate Crimes. He is a founding member of the national Board of People United to Save Humanity (PUSH) and was a delegate to the First African National Congress.

“Speaking Truth to Power: Courage and Conviction for Challenging Times”


Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemoration

 

Jan. 24, 2013, 5 p.m.

Hostetter Chapel

 

Admission is free and open to the public; no ticket required.

 

For more information, contact Tatiana Diaz, director of multicultural programs, at:

 

tdiaz@messiah.edu

or

717-796-1800, ext. 6930

 

Sponsored by Messiah College Multicultural Programs


Geoffrey Galt Harpham


President and Director of the National Humanities Center

 

Geoffrey Galt Harpham is president and director of the National Humanities Center, the only institute for advanced study in the world dedicated exclusively to the humanities. He was trained as a literary scholar, but his work has encompassed a wide range of topics and fields. His longstanding scholarly interests include the role of ethics in literary study, the place of language in intellectual history and the work of author Joseph Conrad. In recent years, Harpham has become a prominent historian of and advocate for the humanities. He has received fellowships from the J.S. Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Under his leadership, the National Humanities Center has sponsored initiatives that have encouraged dialogue between the humanities and natural and social sciences.

“Melancholy in the Midst of Abundance: How Americans Invented the Humanities”


Spring Humanities Symposium Keynote Lecture


2013 Symposium Theme: “Wealth: The Promises and Perils of Abundance”


Feb. 21, 2013, 8 p.m.
Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

 

Admission is free and open to the public; no ticket required.


For more information, contact Tina Keul at:

 

tkeul@messiah.edu

or

717-796-5077


Sponsored by the Messiah College Center for Public Humanities


Emmanuel Katongole


Associate Professor of Theology and World Christianity, Duke Divinity School


Born and educated in Uganda, Emmanuel Katongole was ordained a Roman Catholic priest by the Kampala Archdiocese in 1987 and has subsequently served parishes in Africa, Europe and the United States. In 2001 he became professor of theology and world Christianity at Duke Divinity School and helped co-found the Center of Reconciliation. Katongole’s teaching, preaching and scholarship covers a wide range of issues related to Christianity and violence, including the genocide in Rwanda. His most recent book, The Sacrifice of Africa (2010), examines the role of stories in the formation of faith and political identity in postcolonial Africa. In January 2013, Katongole will be joining the faculty of the University of Notre Dame.

“Christian Social Imagination: Envisioning the Kingdom of God Today”


The Messiah College Religion and Society Lecture

 

Feb. 26, 2013, 7:30 p.m.
Hostetter Chapel

 

Admission is free and open to the public; no ticket required.

 

For more information, contact Carol Hostetter at:

 

hostette@messiah.edu

 

Sponsored by the Messiah College Annual Lectures on Religion and Society


Leymah Gbowee


2011 Nobel Peace Laureate, President of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa

 

Leymah Gbowee is a Liberian peace activist, trained social worker, women’s rights advocate and recipient of the 2011 Nobel Peace Laureate. She is founder and president of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa, head of the Liberia Reconciliation Initiative and co-founder and executive director of Women Peace and Security Network Africa (WISPEN-A). She is also a founding member and former Liberia Coordinator of Women in Peacebuilding Network/West Africa Network for Peacebuilding (WIPNET/WANEP). Gbowee’s leadership of the Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace—which brought together Christian and Muslim women in a nonviolent movement that played a pivotal role in ending Liberia’s civil war in 2003—is chronicled in her memoir “Mighty Be Our Powers,” and in the documentary, “Pray the Devil Back to Hell.”

 

 

March 18, 2013, 7:30 p.m.
The Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

 

Admission is free and open to the public; but a ticket is required. Please contact the ticket office after January 15, 2013.

 

Please contact the Messiah College Ticket Office at:

717-691-6036

 

Sponsored by the Office of the President