Click here to return to Messiah College's homepage
Click here to return to the Department of Engineering homepage
Quicklinks

 
Department of Engineering:
Our Program
Our Facilities
Our Faculty
Our School
Activities
Calendar/Newsletter
Resources
Contact Us

Academic Departments:

Messiah Schools :

Related Links:
   
 

9th Annual Symposium - April 27, 2012 Webcast Archive Questions

Because of the tight timing on the presentations, often there are questions that are posed by people watching the webcast that we are not able to ask of the presenters during the webcast. We have taken all of these questions and asked them of the presenters after the event and asked them to write a response. These questions and answers are given here.

Garden Water Access Project (Water) - Lindsey Adomat & Zachary Mino

Question:

What type of welding did you use to make the pump?

Answer:

For our Prototypes we use MIG welding, as it is the quickest to learn. In the field the pumps will be stick welded.

LSA Nuts and Bolts (and a few rivets) (Transportation) - Alyssa Mylin

Question:

Has the different weight distribution from having somone "lay" in the plane been taken into account?

Answer:

The plane was designed to put the occupants as close to the CG as possible, so that flying with or without a passenger would affect the weight and balance as little as possible. Having a person lying on the backboard puts their CG slightly aft of the passenger seat, which will have an effect on the overall CG of the plane, but because the moment arm is small, the effect is minor and will not push the CG beyond the aft limit for safe flight. Also, having the fuel tank behind the passenger compartment means that as the fuel is used, the CG shifts forward slightly, which would tend to offset the effect of the patient on the board. Of course, all these calculations are theoretical and will be checked carefully when the plane is completed, prior to flight.

LSA Engine Integration Team (Transportation) - Andrew Basom, Andrew Breighner, & Jacob Francis

Question:

Has anyone in your team thought about looking into fracture mechanics analysis of the parts? This may help in analysis of components.

Answer:

This is not something we have looked into yet, but it will be necessary to perform this kind of analysis at some point in the future. We can find the maximum allowable crack size to avoid failure, and use that as a criteria for mount replacement.

User Interface for the Electric Motorcycle (Transportation) - Sara Finn

Question:

What microprocessor did you use for your project?

Answer:

We are using a Freescale HSC12 microcontroller. The same one that is used for the microprocessor programing class here.

Electric Tricycle Spline Shaft and Bearing Evaluation (Disability Resources) - Ryan Schroeder & Marc Hoaglinz

Question:

Was there consideration for heat treating the splines to provide case-hardening effects?

Answer:

That was not considered. There are other styles of planetary gears, such as ones with solid steel output plates, opposed to the current sintered metal, that were considered instead of heat treatment.

Disability Resources Tricycle Durability Project (Disability Resources) - Luke Sisson

Question:

Is your rotational sensor mount on the drive wheel or on the non-driven wheel and how do you account for a stuck in the mud condition when the wheel is spinning but not moving the tricycle forward or backward?

Answer:

The rotational sensor is situated in an aluminum fixture at a prescribed distance from the non-driven wheel. As the wheel rotates, the sensor records the passing of a ferrous material on one of the wheel spokes and counts that as one full revolution. As for the stuck in the mud condition, there would be no problem here. Even if the driven wheel is spinning, the non-driven wheel will be stationary and no errant data will be recorded. Additionally, the testing here at Messiah College is on carefully specified terrain. This is done to replicate Burkina Faso conditions, but also to avoid troublesome surfaces, such as muddy ground.

Improving Water Access For Persons With Disabilities in Africa (Disability Resources) - Sarah Finney

Question:

Thank you for the great pictures and analysis. If children were running into the large pump handle, we can assume there is a probability that they will run into the sharp end of the P handle, correct? What can be done to prevent injury from that cut end of the pipe?

Answer:

Great questions! Yes, we can assume that the children may run into this extension as well. However, if you take a look at, and compare the overall surface area taken up by the oval handle extension and the P handle extension, the P handle extension takes up a smaller total surface area and therefore would cause a lesser probability of being ran into by children. And to answer your second question, because it is very hard to manufacture that piece with an end that wouldn't potentially harm children, I have seen them place something like a rubber stopper on the end of the pipe so it gives a little cushion to the possible impact.

Question:

Can a handle (rope?) be added to the Bucket Tipper? It seemed your test model was having to bend over very far and put strain on her back.

Answer:

There is no reason that a rope could not be attached to the handle to make it more comfortable to pour out the water from a standing position. However, this picture is not the most accurate as to how they use the bucket tipper. Most of the time the users are in a squatting position, or kneeling or sitting on the ground, so the current handle position is decently comfortable for them. So, while an extension of the handle, such as sting, may not be hugely necessary for most situations, it still can be taken into consideration for those who cannot comfortably squat or sit on the floor.

Biodiesel Centrifuging (Energy) - Trevor Lee & Beau Herndon

Question:

Could the centrifuge be automated, so that time spent waiting is decreased? Time is money.

Answer:

It could be possible, but with our system and budget, no. There are a few issues that make the automation of this system very challenging. The most immediate difficulty that I see has to do with the flow rate. We have not been able to find a flow meter that accurately and consistently measures the flow of the waste vegetable oil into and out of the centrifuge. This is primarily because of clogging and pressure changes, and also when you adjust the input valve, the flow fluctuates greatly for a period of time before finally becoming steady. I think it would be awesome if we could somehow implement a solar-powered, automated centrifuge system, but I just don't see that happening anytime in the near future given the budget and current priorities of the Biodiesel Group.

Kilowatt-Hour Meter Project (Energy) - Kevin Manieri, David Allen, & Jonathon Martin

Question:

Are there plans to make a Mahadaga electric utility?

Answer:

Currently there are no plans for a Mahadaga electric utility. Perhaps in the future the Collaboratory can look into it though.

 

Messiah College | One College Avenue | Mechanicsburg PA 17055 | 717-766-2511
Comments or questions? Contact the Engineering WebMaster. Last revised 06/13/2007.
© 2013 Messiah College