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Students invest themselves in the global community


Dokimoi Ergatai is just one of many student organizations sponsored by the Collaboratory for Strategic Partnerships and Applied Research in the School of Mathematics, Engineering, and Business. Whether service-oriented or competitive, these clubs offer students a hands-on opportunity to put their skills to the test.

The Flying Club provides real-life experience in the world of flight through lessons and membership in the Mid-Atlantic Soaring Association. The Flying Club, with help from partners like Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF), is currently building a two-person light-sport airplane for use in international missions aviation.

Antenna Communications and Telemetry Systems (ACTS) develops communication technologies that support missions, development, and disaster relief work around the world. They are collaborating with Partners in Technology International (PACTEC) and students with interest in electrical engineering, aviation, radio, computer software, mapping, and visual display to develop an automatic position recording system that will help aviators transport goods and people to remote or difficult-to-reach locations.

The Investment Club allows students to do some real-world financial management, as the group makes decisions to-gether about how to invest. Students learn to be good stewards of the resources entrusted to them and are encouraged to invest in companies with a concern for social justice.
The proceeds benefit the College.

The Landmine Action Project seeks to remove landmines and prevent their use, rehabilitate landmine survivors and reintegrate them into society, and educate society about landmines and their effects. In 2004, the group was invited to demonstrate a mock minefield at the Marshall Legacy Institute’s awards and benefit gala in Washington, D.C.

World Vision partnerships offer students more opportunities for service in Africa. In July, Jim Krimmel, associate professor of accounting, led a team of two students and one alumnus to hold fraud-prevention seminars for over 30 World Vision financial leaders in Ghana. Also, Brian Nejmeh, associate professor of business information systems and entrepreneurship, is working with students to create a database for World Vision offices in Africa to track vital information.

Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE), an international organization, has an active chapter at Messiah College. Last year, Messiah SIFE covered the globe, offering business consulting for a farm in Costa Rica and helping two women in Indonesia launch a quilt-making business.

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) is comprised of students training to become certified tax assistants. The club offers complimentary help with federal, state, and local income tax procedures primarily for low-income and retired individuals.

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